Oculus go?

  • I do not recommend getting an Oculus Go for any design or presentation purpose. It does not have any positional tracking for both head and controller, which lowers the immersion/presence a lot. Also, its a standalone device which would make the transmittance of screen content from Enscape at least "challenging". I think its more a playback device for panoramic stereo videos.


    VR can be useful, but if the setup is imperfect, it is tedious to use. Therefore: Invest in a good setup or save the money.

  • That could work but quality wise it will be compatable to cardboard so you could also go with that.

    That's an unfair comparison - Oculus Go and google cardboard are in totally different leagues, representing the top and bottom of mobile vr in terms of quality. The lenses and resolution on the Go are actually better than the Rift (although I'm dissapointed with the amount of chromattic aberration I'm seeing).


    That said, the Rift is wayyyy better assuming you have the setup (aka computer) for it. Having positional tracking and the gpu horsepower to do realistic graphics makes a world of difference. Using the Go definitely feels like a step backwards by comparison, though at only $200 I can't really complain for what it is. The main reason I got it was for its portability and to be able to present static 360 panoramas to clients on the go (where it should perform equally or better than the Rift in terms of visual quality).


    Since you already have the setup though Solo, I would definitely get the Rift. It's been selling for as low as $350 recently.

  • That's an unfair comparison - Oculus Go and google cardboard are in totally different leagues, representing the top and bottom of mobile vr in terms of quality. The lenses and resolution on the Go are actually better than the Rift (although I'm dissapointed with the amount of chromattic aberration I'm seeing).


    That said, the Rift is wayyyy better assuming you have the setup (aka computer) for it. Having positional tracking and the gpu horsepower to do realistic graphics makes a world of difference. Using the Go definitely feels like a step backwards by comparison, though at only $200 I can't really complain for what it is. The main reason I got it was for its portability and to be able to present static 360 panoramas to clients on the go (where it should perform equally or better than the Rift in terms of visual quality).


    Since you already have the setup though Solo, I would definitely get the Rift. It's been selling for as low as $350 recently.

    Is that with controllers?


    What about the Vive, is it better than Oculus?

  • Is that with controllers?


    What about the Vive, is it better than Oculus?

    Yup, controllers as well. I feel a bit cheated considering I bought it at full price a little over a year for $800, but ever since last Fall they've dropped the price all the way to $400 for everything, with some sales bringing it even lower. The Vive is currently $500.


    As far as the two headsets go, they're pretty comparable. The Vive is generally considered to have better tracking, while the Rift has better hand controllers (more ergonomic) and is slightly more polished overall, with built in headphones and an adjustable headstrap. Spec wise, they're the same. Personally, I prefer the Rift because it's more comfortable and the controllers are far superior. I have one I use at my desk. We have a VR room in the office with a Vive in it, so I've used both. If you want to get full room scale tracking with the Rift, they reccomend that you buy a third sensor, which is around $50. The Vive does fine with two, but I find they make a low rumbling noise because of the vibrating lasers inside which is a little annoying. Some people have successfully set up room scale Rift setups with only two sensors by mounting them up high in opposite corners of the room. This is an area where the Samsung Odyssey headset has an advantage over both, because it uses inside out tracking (camera based), meaning there are no external sensors to worry about setting up. It also has higher resolution being newer, but there are other drawbacks such as the weight/ergonomics and higher performance requirements, meaning Enscape likely won't run as well, even on a pair of 1080tis, which incidentally is what I have as well. :thumbsup:


    The Vive Pro just came out recently which should be the best of them all, but whether it's worth $1100 is up for debate. Most people say it's not, but if money is no object, go for it (though it still uses the same original Vive wand controllers, so the Rift has it beat there). In terms of value, I'd say the Rift definitely wins among all of them.


    Here's a helpful comparison chart someone did showing the pros and cons of each: https://www.reddit.com/r/oculu…son_of_the_current_pc_vr/

  • I bought the Vive PRO recently, and I'm quite satisfied with the results so far, the resolution is a (small) step forward, but also problems of the past, like fresnell, godrays, glare are still present due to the poor quality of the lenses; now I consider to do a modification with Gear VR lenses

  • That's an unfair comparison - Oculus Go and google cardboard are in totally different leagues, representing the top and bottom of mobile vr in terms of quality.

    Ok, that's right and depends on your phone. If you have a modern one and one of the "better" cardboards, even plastic, the experience can come quite close.


    It also has higher resolution being newer, but there are other drawbacks such as the weight/ergonomics and higher performance requirements, meaning Enscape likely won't run as well, even on a pair of 1080tis, which incidentally is what I have as well

    We have spent work in improving the performance on this high resolution headsets. You'll be able to test it in the next preview (and of course regular) release.

  • Thanks for info, I have been reading a lots of comparisons but they are all gaming based, what about Enscape, how does the Vive compare to the Rift, which is best for Enscape?

    Again, I feel like the Rift comes out on top here. You can get more nuanced movement out the Rift controllers than the Vive wands owing to their use of a joystick rather than a thumbpad. With the Vive, you're either going or stopped - with the Rift you can gradually accelerate and decelerate, allowing for more nuanced movement.


    And in terms of framerate, it's also possible that'll you'll get more reliable performance out of the Rift (less prone to dropping frames and stuttering, which is the ultimate immersion breaker in VR). This is because Oculus has developed software tricks that fill in missing frames when the gpu can't keep up, known as time warp and space warp. The Vive still doesn't have this full ability. Now ideally for most applications, you'd never be missing frames to begin with (90fps), especially on a 1080ti, but Enscape pushes the limits of what's possible for VR. When you put it on ultra settings, it probably only maintains 15-20 fps (for anything beyond a simple model) and you'll notice black banding around the edges of the screen when you move your head, where it hasn't been able to compute information quickly enough to keep up.


    It has certainly improved over time though, and performance keeps getting better. It's already a marvel that it can run as well as it does when you consider the realtime lighting and reflections being computed.

  • Thanks Tower.


    One last question, I have a lot of Californian based clients that for some reason only use Mac's, any way to export an Enscape VR model to a format they can use?

  • I have a lot of Californian based clients that for some reason only use Mac's, any way to export an Enscape VR model to a format they can use?

    Not yet. But we're working on a web-export that will allow you to send them an experience similar to the EXE export that should run on most devices with a web browser.

  • I just got the Go and have to say that the Oculus Go WILL have a place in the Enscape market. It's cheap, portable, and the lens and image quality is just as good as the Rift. In all honesty, after using VR and Enscape for a few months now I am realizing that you really don't want clients to have full reign to walk all around a model most of the time. Pick a few key vantage points, let them click through and look around, and then move on with the presentation. No really one wants to wear the headset for any more than a few minutes I am finding. Also, being able to grab the Go and run out the door and not pack up the laptop, sensors, cables and then have to set that all up is really huge for me. It's all so much of a pain that I have been using VR less and less but now with the Go I can see us using it more.

  • I just got the Go and have to say that the Oculus Go WILL have a place in the Enscape market. It's cheap, portable, and the lens and image quality is just as good as the Rift. In all honesty, after using VR and Enscape for a few months now I am realizing that you really don't want clients to have full reign to walk all around a model most of the time. Pick a few key vantage points, let them click through and look around, and then move on with the presentation. No really one wants to wear the headset for any more than a few minutes I am finding. Also, being able to grab the Go and run out the door and not pack up the laptop, sensors, cables and then have to set that all up is really huge for me. It's all so much of a pain that I have been using VR less and less but now with the Go I can see us using it more.

    This is pretty much my experience. However, there are occasions when the Rift is very useful but not usually the case with clients who usually have limited time and patience to experience a nice VR model. But I am still disappointed that the Oculus Go is not more interactive. It's basically a fancy version of the cardboard.

  • This is pretty much my experience. However, there are occasions when the Rift is very useful but not usually the case with clients who usually have limited time and patience to experience a nice VR model. But I am still disappointed that the Oculus Go is not more interactive. It's basically a fancy version of the cardboard.

    Santa Cruz will help to bridge that gap when it comes out (likely next year) as it's basically a hybrid version of the Rift and Go, with the same portability (wireless, no computer) as the Go, but positionally tracked (x,y,z) headset and controllers. Where it will still lag significantllly behind the Rift is in computing horsepower however, as it will be reliant on a mobile chipset rather than desktop gpu. I bet that Enscape would run on the lowest (draft) quality settings if optimized correctly though.

  • VStudio The Oculus Go could be interesting for me and my clients. It could be the simple and inexpensive tool for short visits to a VR space every few weeks/months. I don't want to spend a lot of money for the short usage. My clients are placed far away from me and would need own devices. So far the situation.


    But I don't understand the usage and maybe you can help me. How can be used the wireless Oculus Go together with Enscape on a PC?