Over exposed panorama

  • I find that if I tune my exposure settings for being an internal room (or leave it on 'auto') then the views where I can see a large picture window are blown out:

    http://panorama.enscape3d.com/view/kpmt0plv


    (Also note the bowl sitting on the unit under the TV: something weird happening with the reflections.)

  • Hi Gadget when the exposure in your internal room is to your liking, but the outside is rather bright, then the windows will naturally have this over-exposure you're seeing. Keep in mind, this behaviour is normal in photography as well.


    In this case it's best to find a good middle-ground and I generally recommend deactivating Auto Exposure before you render the panorama, because when leaving the Auto Exposure checkbox active before creating a panorama rendering, the rendering will be darkened or brightened depending on the brightness of the particular area you were looking at.


    Regarding the reflection, could you please take a normal screenshot as well and let us know if this issue persists? Our panoramas are rendered in slices, which is why your reflection might look a bit weird.

  • I understand why it's happening, but when I 'look' in the direction of the window it's OK - no-where near as blown out as the panorama:



    The bowl reflections look off when walking round it, panoramas and in renders:


  • Hey Gadget , you may want to create a few panorama from different view perspectives to achieve the exposure you're looking for - The panorama exposure is currently defined by the last spot you had a look at before rendering, this means that if you were looking at the dimmest point in your internal room, bright areas will in fact be overly bright.


    Further, this reflection behaviour is actually normal and due to the fact that the bowl masks a bit of the wall behind which would usually be visible in the reflection at hand, but since we don't have a screen space value of said bit of the wall, we solve this via ray tracing (with a more approximated lighting calculation). This is why the lighting isn't perfectly accurate, in this case it's darker.

  • The exposure is not set by the last point you looked at or the direction you are facing: it's where it decides to start rendering the panorama and the whole panorama is taken with these settings. (Which is not determined by where you are facing).


    I expect the panorama to look similar to what I get by holding the LMB and wiggle the mouse around - the above panorama is so distant from that experience I feel embarrassed showing clients it.

  • I know that the behavior of the bowl reflections is expected if you know how the software generates the images, but it is an unexpected effect for those just looking at the images. (Could be an area for the programmers to look at tidying up a little bit?):

    20 second clip orbiting the bowl -



    {BTW I still hold the software in the highest regard :) }

  • The exposure is not set by the last point you looked at or the direction you are facing: it's where it decides to start rendering the panorama and the whole panorama is taken with these settings. (Which is not determined by where you are facing).

    The Panorama is taken from the current position and view direction inside Enscape inlcuding the last active exposure. How else would you be able to have some control.

    I know that the behavior of the bowl reflections is expected if you know how the software generates the images, but it is an unexpected effect for those just looking at the images.

    We will have a look at it.

    Which version of Enscape are you using?

  • The Panorama is taken from the current position and view direction inside Enscape inlcuding the last active exposure. How else would you be able to have some control.

    The panorama is taken from the current position, but not the view position:

    - I have experimented with looking in every direction and starting rendering the pano

    - I have changed the exposure settings


    The result is that it always starts rendering with the camera pointing at the same point and the exposure settings are set looking there: You have very little control over the exposure of the pano. (The 'live' view does not reflect the 'pano' render)


    Enscape 2.3.0.221-g193a420

  • Gadget It will take your direction but will ignore any angles different from the horizon. So if you're looking at the ground or the ceiling , the Pano will be focused on the horizon.


    I've forwarded the request for a more dynamic exposure range for Panoramas to our developers.

  • Gadget It will take your direction but will ignore any angles different from the horizon. So if you're looking at the ground or the ceiling , the Pano will be focused on the horizon.

    That's what I'm trying to tell you: this may be the intended behavior, however I can look out the window (where the exposure would be low) or face to look into the building (where the exposure would be high) and I still get identical renders.


    This is the same model and I've put the kitchen (lit) in: I have not changed any settings in regard to the exposure. (This was/is a saved view, so the location should be identical too.)

    http://panorama.enscape3d.com/view/ctjuohxm

  • I tried; the exposure chosen when looking at the 'window' is (/was) looking ok, as shown in the third post (not auto). However these same settings that give a good image on walk-through produce the blown out results in panorama.