real 255,255,255 white background

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    • Official Post

    alejandromartin , thanks a lot for your request - you're also not the first to ask for this, but currently it's basically not possible to have a perfectly white background so to speak since there are too many variables in play which affect the overall colour output of our real-time rendering. Meanwhile, while I have forwarded your Feedback, you will have to use post production.


    If you weren't aware, there is also a little "trick" to make things easier for you hopefully:

    "Turn on depth map in the capture settings and increase the range to its highest, when you render an image now you’ll get 4 images one of which will be the depth which you can use as an alpha mask in the likes of photoshop/Afinity Photo."

    • Best Answer

    For post-production, there are two options I'm familiar with:


    A) PowerPoint > blank slide > paste the image > Artistic Effects > Soft Edges > Pick the percentage you think is most suitable > Right click the image once you're satisfied and save picture as PNG to maintain the transparency at of the soft edges. This will give a gradual transition/gradient between the Enscape background and the white sheet.


    B) Photoshop, tutorials:


    - https://www.dummies.com/softwa…g-in-adobe-photoshop-cs6/

    - https://www.picturecorrect.com…edge-border-in-photoshop/

    - Plenty of other tutorials out there. Also, check the method using the Gaussian blur.


    They're not perfect solutions but saves me time. Hope that helps!

  • Not universal depending on your scene, but in my experience orthographic perspective does do a true white background. Typically I'll only care about scenes having true white backgrounds in a composition that is well served by an orthographic perspective anyways so this works perfectly fine for me.


    In your example, I think compositionally an ortho perspective would not only make that view look compositionally better, but it'd also get you the white background you are looking for.