Would love some tips on rendering a "white" room

  • Hello gang, I am very new to enscape and was working on a white laundry room. I am finding it a little difficult yo get it to look good? I am using a combination of sphere lights , IES spot lights and a rectangle light.


    I was hoping someone could share a few tips :) I have attached a quick render of what I have so far. I have used the Benjamin color "simply white" on everything, ceiling walls and cabinets.


    Thank you


    Jay

  • Maybe try a colored light, a cylinder object on the ceiling with a luminous property. Maybe add a person as well, adult or child and a cat or dog perhaps, to show scale and atmosphere. Looks quite cold at the moment. perhaps have a scatter of clothes on the counter top or floor for realism.

  • A lot of this seems to come down to the surfaces not having much reflectiveness/gloss and bump (some, none at all). Although you have used the same color paint for the trim, wall, ceiling, cabinets, etc, it is more likely that each item would have a different bump and gloss. Walls would have some orange peel texture to them and the trim and ceiling might have more of a flat and higher gloss sheen - cabinets as well. I also don't see any gloss or effectiveness on the floor? Did you add a map to it? I'd expect it to bounce some of the light. I would also turn down your lines outline % a bit. The counter marble also looks flat- but that could be from lack of light (see below).


    I can see a light reflection in the ceiling from the "fake" lighting. It's offputting because the main light sources in the room from what I can tell are just the can lights- which would be pretty typical for this room. As Winston above me mentioned, the lighting could use some color temperature adjustment and not just "white". Add some accent lighting under the cabinets to help shine up the countertops.


    Add an emitting material to the lens of the can lights to help show off the light source. Drop a IES into each and give it some color. If you need more fill light, add a rectangle in the center just to help brighten things up a bit.

  • One thing also is that you shouldn't be using a pure white colour for it - there are no surfaces that exist in the real world like that


    I tend to use 70-80% you can get paints that are closer to 90% -


    or in enscape



    This will play better with exposure and the ability to the surface to be illuminated further - by lighting.

  • A lot of this seems to come down to the surfaces not having much reflectiveness/gloss and bump (some, none at all). Although you have used the same color paint for the trim, wall, ceiling, cabinets, etc, it is more likely that each item would have a different bump and gloss. Walls would have some orange peel texture to them and the trim and ceiling might have more of a flat and higher gloss sheen - cabinets as well. I also don't see any gloss or effectiveness on the floor? Did you add a map to it? I'd expect it to bounce some of the light. I would also turn down your lines outline % a bit. The counter marble also looks flat- but that could be from lack of light (see below).


    I can see a light reflection in the ceiling from the "fake" lighting. It's offputting because the main light sources in the room from what I can tell are just the can lights- which would be pretty typical for this room. As Winston above me mentioned, the lighting could use some color temperature adjustment and not just "white". Add some accent lighting under the cabinets to help shine up the countertops.


    Add an emitting material to the lens of the can lights to help show off the light source. Drop a IES into each and give it some color. If you need more fill light, add a rectangle in the center just to help brighten things up a bit.

    I definitely recommend that you include this approach in your workflow. This would save you a lot of time from post-processing. If you are using bitmaps from the net you can definitely use the albedo as maps for bump and roughness maps and tweak it here and there. You can also use the available materials in the Enscape material pallet then tweak image fade and set your color to a white color. I usually download maps then use the bump/normal maps to add depth and realism to flat colors.

  • I have similar issues when rendering elevation.. sometimes for come competition project they like a lot of White on the elevation.. and it always come blue-ee, yellow-ee etc.. never white.. Easiest cheat that I found was to add a bit of self illuminance.