Sconce Light Issue

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  • Hello,


    First off, if I remember correctly, Enscape lighting fixtures used to turn on and glow in SketchUp when shifting the time to night? This isn't the case now (unless I'm missing something).

    I'm showing these traditional sconces with a down light that I applied separately using the lights objects. The problem is that the bulb itself is not lite, and there's no way to edit the Enscape lighting fixture to apply an emissive material to it.

    If anyone have a solution or a work around, please share.

  • I think technically the lights are always on, but often you simply can’t see it due to sun lighting(?)

    I’d like some official clarification on this though


    If the model itself doesn’t have an emissive bulb- the only thing I can think to do is to make a piece of geometry with an emissive material on it and position it is such a way it is inside the geometry that is visible in enscape.

  • Adam.Fairclough thanks for the followup. I think what you've suggested is viable. See the result below:

    I wish the 'self-illuminated material' is brighter, but that's the maximum that the intensity slider can go to :(

    The intensity slider should go up plenty high enough - if we are using real life examples , then 300cdm2 is about as bright as a computer screen 10,000cdm2 is about as bright as a fluorescent bulb.


    If it is looking too dim it could suggest that either the rest of the lighting in the scene to bright relative to that or perhaps the glass of the geometry is interfering with how it looks?

  • The intensity slider should go up plenty high enough - if we are using real life examples , then 300cdm2 is about as bright as a computer screen 10,000cdm2 is about as bright as a fluorescent bulb.


    If it is looking too dim it could suggest that either the rest of the lighting in the scene to bright relative to that or perhaps the glass of the geometry is interfering with how it looks?

    The luminance of the 'self-illuminated' material is at it max (100,000 cd/m2

    Camera exposure 34%

    Sun brightness 0%

    Night sky brightness 13%

    Artificial light brightness 180%

    Ambient brightness 100%

    I'm using a sky-box of a brightness of 6,105.03 lux

    For the time being it looks good for our office standard. I will take another look into it sometime later.