Apple Pro Vision

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  • Are there any plans at this point to somehow integrate the use of Apple Pro Vision for a VR experience, presumably I suppose with Mac interface? I'm honestly not knowledgeable enough to even ask the question in the right way (I'm a PC/Revit user)...but I just saw a promotional video for Apple Pro Vision and it looked pretty incredible. It looked like a device that might become quite popular and owned by a lot of people-- including clients. Just wondering...

  • It looked like a device that might become quite popular and owned by a lot of people-- including clients.

    Highly doubtful. It's 100% a niche, early adopter device at $3,500 and running its own hardware and OS (visionOS). Runs on the M2 chip, which is no slouch but still limited by mobile battery & thermals, so outright rendering performance won't be like a traditional workstation. It'll likely boil down to being some sort of basic wireless link app- screen mirroring. In which case, you'd be wildly overpaying for something a Quest 2 could do for $250 (or Quest 3 for $500) which Enscape doesn't officially support either and is definitely the larger market. It's definitely going to be an early adopter tech demo until they can prove concept and release the "SE" consumer version or whatever they'll call it.

  • It was the first iPhone.

    There were already thousands of "smart" phones, blackberries, WAP (?) cell phones with internet access

    on the market. Apple just made one that was easy to use and fun.

    (I wonder, if Apple did not have developed an iPhone for whatever reason, how far would we have come

    along until today - from a Nokia Communicator)


    Simplified for the Vision Pro,

    An AR/VR/?R headset that may work in a way potential new users expect and like - or not.

  • It was the first iPhone.

    There were already thousands of "smart" phones, blackberries, WAP (?) cell phones with internet access

    on the market. Apple just made one that was easy to use and fun.

    - With an app market, making the "smart phone" as we know and use it today. It was decidedly different from the Blackberry (and Palm) devices we had at the time.


    My point is the iPhone began the mobile app market which really didn't exist back then. Right now, the VR and mixed reality (AR) market already exists and the upcoming Vision Pro isn't adding anything we haven't see before, as was the case with the iPhone app market. Likely a better hardware build quality, sure - at the exponential $$ premium. I'm happy to see them add some marketing hype to the market so more companies further development of the tech besides Meta.


    Enscape only recently released Mac compatibility. It's lower priority simply because of the smaller user base- not an uncommon development cycle for any software, tbh. Apple-specific VR/AR (yes, I'm sure it'll be a locked down Apple ecosystem) will be even smaller. There's no much more the team can focus on developing within Enscape at the moment.


    We can have this same conversation with "why not support HoloLens?".

  • Highly doubtful. It's 100% a niche, early adopter device at $3,500 and running its own hardware and OS (visionOS). Runs on the M2 chip, which is no slouch but still limited by mobile battery & thermals, so outright rendering performance won't be like a traditional workstation. It'll likely boil down to being some sort of basic wireless link app- screen mirroring. In which case, you'd be wildly overpaying for something a Quest 2 could do for $250 (or Quest 3 for $500) which Enscape doesn't officially support either and is definitely the larger market. It's definitely going to be an early adopter tech demo until they can prove concept and release the "SE" consumer version or whatever they'll call it.

    LOL - thinking that it's screen mirroring and basically the same as a Quest 2 or Quest 3, but just more expensive. The M3 chips (released now when they weren't when AVP was announced) offers real-time raytracing - even the A17 iPhone chip based on the M3.


    People in the know (not Tim) have said just the stuff that was shown in the Summer staged demos was way beyond anything from any other AR/VR headsets' capabilities. The eye/hand controls are the way it should work, not with some dorky hoop controllers in each hand.


    HoloLens has been out for years, is the same cost as AVP, and hasn't made much of an impact because they still haven't solved the accuracy issue (drift) between the BIM/Virtual models and the real site.


    We don't have too much longer to find out.

  • LOL - thinking that it's screen mirroring and basically the same as a Quest 2 or Quest 3, but just more expensive.

    I'm saying, as it currently stands, what we have works- and works well enough for anyone not in a fortune 500 company with deep pockets. Until we have mass market adoption of any VR headset I don't see things changing. Why would most businesses pay the absurd premium for this when what they have gets them what they need already. M3 or not, there are compromises to mobile computing. Tethering (wirelessly or wired) to a full-fledged PC is hands down the performance and quality winner. Leaving the unit to do the hand tracking computing. Great...

    The eye/hand controls are the way it should work, not with some dorky hoop controllers in each hand.

    Quest has hand tracking. Will Apple's be better? Probably.


    My point about HoloLens is simply that it had the hype too. Maybe that AR is being pushed hard now instead of VR, will see a resurgence? I hope so. AR is pretty cool.

  • The difference being that there are plenty of other VR and mixed reality devices already in the market, whereas iPhone was the first. Very different.


    There were tons of phones already, just not as smart.


    And there was initially no App Store at all.

    But there was the renounce of a physical keyboard that worked.

    And there was double tap to zoom into a web article and such things.


    Not much more than you could already do on some other existing phones.

    But much more comfortable, legible, easier and fun to use.


    I would not swear, but I think that it is likely that current VR glasses features

    may work similar better on a Vision Pro. And some may prefer the build quality

    or App quality and pay the price for it. While market leadership or mass market

    may not be Apples priority.