RTX?

  • Micha RTX will bring little performance improvement to VR as the pure ray traversal in VR is not the bottleneck.


    TowerPower Internally, we also use a super high quality reference path tracer. But these reference path tracers lack any tricks and hacks (hence reference) and therefore they are a few hundred times (at least) slower than Enscape. Does not make sense to release it. But we intend to move at least the Ultra configuration very close to the visual quality that the reference provides.

  • Micha RTX will bring little performance improvement to VR as the pure ray traversal in VR is not the bottleneck.


    TowerPower Internally, we also use a super high quality reference path tracer. But these reference path tracers lack any tricks and hacks (hence reference) and therefore they are a few hundred times (at least) slower than Enscape. Does not make sense to release it. But we intend to move at least the Ultra configuration very close to the visual quality that the reference provides.

    Thanks for the explanation Thomas, that sounds great. Regarding VR then, it sounds like there will be no improvements to framerate as a result of the RTX cores, but since ray traversal isn't the bottleneck in VR, are you then saying you'll be able to turn on RTX features in VR with no performance hit? If so, that's incredible.


    One other benefit I'm curious about is light leaking. Given that raytracing is very good at calculating occlusion (for shadows, ambient occlusion etc.), is light leaking no longer going to be a problem?

  • One other benefit I'm curious about is light leaking. Given that raytracing is very good at calculating occlusion (for shadows, ambient occlusion etc.), is light leaking no longer going to be a problem?

    That's true, it will probably help in utilizing high quality shadows and light transport. Even without RTX, Enscape uses ray tracing but only for a small subset of features. RTX might extend that.

  • so u will bound your software with specific hardware ?

    It already is bound by specific hardware; older/weaker graphics cards won't run Enscape at all, and for VR they recommend a 1070ti or higher.


    Granted, I understand your concern. There are a relatively small number of RTX cards out there at the moment, and they're expensive. To make Enscape dependent on them to do certain features seems unfair to all those who don't have access to the cards. Unfortunately, with a disruptive new technology like RTX, sometimes that's the price of progress. I applaud Enscape and others for taking advantage of the new features now, which in turn should lead to greater adoption of dedicated raytracing hardware in the future (hopefully offered by AMD as well).


    That said, from the sounds of it, you may still be able to do most of the same things on older cards like the 1080ti, just at lower speeds and/or lower fidelity. As Thomas explained, Enscape already uses raytracing for a number of features, and is one of the only real time engines that supports path traced global illumination. They've been able to accomplish many of the lauded features of RTX even without dedicated hardware for a couple years now. This will just make it that much better!

  • It's also worth noting that at GDC a few weeks ago, Nvidia announced that it would be turning on RTX support for a select number of 10 series cards, meaning Enscape could support them too. The major caveat of course is that since the Pascal series lacks the dedicated raytracing cores of Turing, they're orders of magnitude slower, so performance will likely be too low to be acceptable for usage in real time, but perhaps they can enable it for still renders only.