EXR Output

  • Pete Chamberlain ...I have the same issue, and had written about this previously.


    I did not receive an advice on how to workaround my issue and understood EXR (32 bit) was simply different animal and this was expected behavior.


    When working with EXR's and opening in Photoshop, should we expect to be able to match Enscape's 8bit output?


    Thanks!

  • I think there's some confusion going on what the EXR/high dynamic range export is actually doing. It's not expected to match the output of the standard low dynamic range export options, since it does something different. It stores the "raw" brightness information of your scene without doing a so called "tonemapping" operation, which translates brightness information to low dynamic range colors which you can display on your monitor. If you open an EXR file in Photoshop you have to do some sort of tonemapping first in order to display the image. This usually consists of selecting an exposure and other params like gamma.


    If you're not familiar with the procedure I'd recommend to work with low dynamic range image exports instead and let Enscape handle it.


    Quote

    High Dynamic Range images are scene-referred. This means that an HDR image stores the values of light as captured by the camera.

    Unlike output-referred jpeg files produced by cameras, HDR images are not pre-processed for the purpose of a pleasant display on monitors. The values of an HDR image remain proportional to light, i.e. they are linear values. So, the gamma for an HDR image would be just 1, which is the same as to say that they do not have a gamma.

    The linearity of HDR images makes them unfit for direct display on standard monitors.

    (Source https://www.hdrsoft.com/resources/dri.html)

  • You may want to check out this tool to try different options and see how you could do tonemapping: HDRSee

  • Pete Chamberlain


    Thanks very much for insight into your process. I use this method as well.


    I do not find this matches the 8 bit output. Do find that it does?


    What I am attempting to do is avoid wasted time making fine tune adjustments in Enscape, and then having to basically throw those out when opening an EXR in photoshop. If you have any insight as to how to streamline this process, I am all ears.

  • I think there's some confusion going on what the EXR/high dynamic range export is actually doing. It's not expected to match the output of the standard low dynamic range export options, since it does something different. It stores the "raw" brightness information of your scene without doing a so called "tonemapping" operation, which translates brightness information to low dynamic range colors which you can display on your monitor. If you open an EXR file in Photoshop you have to do some sort of tonemapping first in order to display the image. This usually consists of selecting an exposure and other params like gamma.


    If you're not familiar with the procedure I'd recommend to work with low dynamic range image exports instead and let Enscape handle it.


    (Source https://www.hdrsoft.com/resources/dri.html)

    So this is exactly what I was I already understood and was hoping to confirm. Thank you Clemens Musterle ...I can stop asking :-)


    I still think there is a wasted opportunity to somehow begin that process in Enscape and seamlessly transition the work done there into photoshop, possibly via exporting an LUT?

  • I would think that you normaly use EXR when you render out render elements (global Illumination, Lighting, Reflection, Refraction and specular) and add them together in photoshop, then would you get the result you are looking for, but i don't think it is possible i enscape to get thise kind og render elements out right now.



  • I was always under the impression that if you applied a Gamma of .4545 that it should match the 8 bit output, but this does not seem to be the case. Is there any way of translating the EXR to match what comes out of Enscape as an 8 bit image?

    The idea of rendering an HDR is to let you have the raw brightness data, as Clemens has written. Which tools you want to use, and how, to get the desired LDR image from this data is up to you. If you want to have a 100% matching image - simply export usual LDR screenshot instead of EXR. Or know how to master your tools to make it manually, but I don't see any reason why one would want to do it in manually post process when Enscape already does it for you ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • The idea of rendering an HDR is to let you have the raw brightness data, as Clemens has written. Which tools you want to use, and how, to get the desired LDR image from this data is up to you. If you want to have a 100% matching image - simply export usual LDR screenshot instead of EXR. Or know how to master your tools to make it manually, but I don't see any reason why one would want to do it in manually post process when Enscape already does it for you ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    I was hoping to be able to adjust lighting on a series of interiors with 32 bit full float capabilities. This goes back to another post of mine from last week where GI and materials seemed overly dark. I figured with an EXR I would have more flexibility to adjust in post as needed. Even being able to get a 16 bit file would be great.

  • The idea of rendering an HDR is to let you have the raw brightness data, as Clemens has written. Which tools you want to use, and how, to get the desired LDR image from this data is up to you. If you want to have a 100% matching image - simply export usual LDR screenshot instead of EXR. Or know how to master your tools to make it manually, but I don't see any reason why one would want to do it in manually post process when Enscape already does it for you ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Alexander Devaykin


    Perhaps I am just dense ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


    Using other render engines (Vray / Redshift / Thea) I have saved 16-bit output which preserved the same 'look' as the 8bit output but contained additional color information which I found useful in making specific color adjustments in post.


    It has proven to be a nice fallback in case there is a last second need to make specific color adjustments to certain portions of a rendering in post. (ie. "change this color to green" or "brighten this area significantly")


    Are you saying the Enscape render engine is not capable of saving a higher bit depth image with the same look as the preview we achieve in Enscape?

  • I think that the idea is that it would take less (or equivalent) time to re-render the image with the changes than it would to edit it in Photoshop. If Enscape can eliminate the need to do colour correction to the images, then it's almost irrelevant. You have spent time learning how to do it in PS, why not spend time learning how to do it in Enscape?


    (In saying that, i don't fully understand the EXR export and why it can't match the other export formats... or why you would use this format over any other one)