Oculus Quest + Enscape

  • Hi landrvr1 , yes, it works fine for us.

    Does the Oculus work with other software?

    What you describe firstly reminds me of the "Unknown Sources" option. If you've made sure that is checked - do you have other VR systems installed, like Windows Mixed Reality or Steam VR? From our experience, they tend to block each other from time to time..


    Okay, got it working! Once you start the Oculus app on the PC, go into the Enscape menu and enable VR Headset, you have to press the SketchUp button in the Quest environment when you've got the headset on... I was missing that last step.

    Again, I'm using the Link method with a USB3 cable and NOT the wireless hack referenced above.

    I can say this: The Link method is utterly fantastic looking for a VR experience. Great visual fidelity - shadows, reflections, etc. Navigating and menu options work great so far...


  • Okay, got it working! Once you start the Oculus app on the PC, go into the Enscape menu and enable VR Headset, you have to press the SketchUp button in the Quest environment when you've got the headset on... I was missing that last step.

    Again, I'm using the Link method with a USB3 cable and NOT the wireless hack referenced above.

    I can say this: The Link method is utterly fantastic looking for a VR experience. Great visual fidelity - shadows, reflections, etc. Navigating and menu options work great so far...

    Well that's a positive on it's own. How's the tracking (as it doesn't use base stations)?

    Would you be kind enough to give the wireless hack a go?

    Kind regards,

    Chris

  • Our office has been working on getting wireless streaming from a PC to Quest for the past 2 days and finally got a payoff today. It works!


    Control mappings in Enscape were off a bit, for instance we had to click in the joysticks before they would work for movement.


    Setup was not easy at our office due to our network being very restrictive. We brought in some extra equipment today to get it working. Key for us was a dedicated 5ghz router hardwired to the PC that is doing the processing, and a shared internet connection to feed into the router so that Virtual Desktop can establish it's tunnel.


    Virtual Desktop was the winner for us (not free). We tried setting up ALVR (free), but ran into roadblocks with prerequisites on the PC we are utilizing.


    One nugget of insight that would have helped us when we were struggling with setup:

    Virtual Desktop requires an internet connection to initiate the tunnel, ALVR does not. This would have made ALVR ideal for our use due to our network restrictions, but we just couldn't get it to install properly on the machine we were using.


    Keep in mind that the whole process relies on side-loading unofficial apps on the Quest to get it up and running, the functionality could disappear tomorrow if one link in the chain fails. But this tech needs to be a thing permanently and it needs to be more approachable, it really sells the technology.


    We were able to connect an android phone to the stream as well, and through this we will be able to push the stream to another display via chromecast. Still kinda reeling from the experience of all of it and how well it worked.

  • NICE! Can you describe your scene? Poly count? Complexity? I can certainly appreciate any approach which is unteathered, but with clients we need a rock solid platform that's replicable/reliable. Repeat engagements with the same clients must be consistent and worthwhile. The hackable approach to wireless seems fun, but I'm going to avoid it for now. The biggest pitfall is going to be a drop in framerate. Remember, motion sickness sets in with pretty much anyone when those FPS fall below 60. A hacked wireless solution is just asking for trouble, lol.

    Of course, if all you're showing is a simple model....

    Would love more details on your scene.

    I'm much more interested in true sideloading of a file onto the Quest - not streaming. In that case there will definitely need to be compromises in scene size and visual fidelity. Of course, that's still a crazy hack solution, lol.

  • Control mappings in Enscape were off a bit, for instance we had to click in the joysticks before they would work for movement.

    Thank you for sharing.


    I have success with this setup as well as shared by me in another thread. Solved the internet connection by using my phone as hotspot (for remote locations without wifi)


    The only thing which is not working is the teleport button. I was not able to remap buttons in SteamVR.


    Can you please elaborate on how you got this to work?

  • I can say this: The Link method is utterly fantastic looking for a VR experience. Great visual fidelity - shadows, reflections, etc.

    Agreed. Are you aware of the Oculus developer tool which allows you to easily increase the resolution when using the link cable?


    On my phone now but if you Google it you can find how it works. It is a simple hack.


    Be aware that after a restart your computer you will have to re-enter the higher supersampling resolution again. Worth the hassle though.

  • Sorry to hijack the thread..... :|


    Does anyone in here know of alternative link cables for the quest?

    The link cable is out of stock and it seems unknown when it’s back in store.

    There's a company called "Party Link" that sell 3 and 5m cables that supposedly works great with the quest, I haven't tried it out to so be sure to read some reviews first

  • Agreed. Are you aware of the Oculus developer tool which allows you to easily increase the resolution when using the link cable?


    On my phone now but if you Google it you can find how it works. It is a simple hack.


    Be aware that after a restart your computer you will have to re-enter the higher supersampling resolution again. Worth the hassle though.

    Sweet! Tnx for that. Gotta try it. Question: Do you know how to display the framerate in the Quest?

  • Thanks for your descriptions everybody, and congrats to everybody having set up their desired connection. vertigo1 , can you explain by what you mean by clicking in the controllers?

    Kaj Burival The analog sticks have a click input, this has to be initiated before movement of the sticks is registered.


    annevanzwol The teleport worked for us without fuss, I believe it was one of the two trigger buttons.


    landrvr1 We were using the sample architectural scene that comes with Revit to test with. It is a good middle of the road test by my summation. Scene weight really won't have any bearing on the performance of the wireless streaming quality. The PC we were rendering with is a Threadripper with a 2080Ti, so the quality wired or wireless would be similar from an appearance standpoint. The router is going to be the biggest factor for the wireless streaming quality (framerate) and distance you can get out of it. We were using a Linksys WRT for the test.

  • Wireless VR Update March 09, 2020


    We have had many successful wireless VR Enscape demos using VR Desktop over the last month...but we have found a tool that is much simpler to operate and set up: VRidge by RiftCat. We have also experimented with ALVR, but no success with that one as of yet.


    We have tried many different network setups for this now, and stand by our original assessment of the key component being a dedicated 5ghz router hardwired to the rendering computer. If you are trying a wireless VR setup and you don't employ this piece of hardware, the experience can be sub-optimal.

  • So to clarify, your solution still requires a desktop/laptop machine to run enscape and stream the experience to the wireless Quest? Its great that this is possible...


    ...However... the biggest barrier to client engagement is the GPU requirement. Its not reasonable to have a dedicated VR capable machine for each person in a meeting and it diminishes the usefulness when people a have to take turns to participate.


    If the Quest could run an optimized/"game-ifyed" EXE file, we could buy enough quests for a small army of meeting participants and simply push the exe to each.


    Iris VR Prospect has had multi-user and untethered Quest support for a long time. The visual quality is just severely lacking but the functionality is impressive.

  • That hardware barrier will not go away anytime soon.


    While it is not even yet possible to fit the Quest with the hardware in it to accomplish real-time raytracing, if it were, the cost of the headset would be well over $2000 and that would become the barrier to outfitting a room full of people with what is needed to reach the pinnacle of what we are after here, Our goals are the same after all.


    Yes, we have experimented with IrisVR, Insite, TheWild etc. They all can work natively on the Quest, and they all have the same visual fidelity issue due to the resources on the Quest being inadequate. Strip an Enscape file down to what would run on the Quest natively and we are going to be in a similar situation, but Enscape does not have the collaboration features that the other products have.


    VR Chat is probably the best bet for everything you are after today, but the application comes with an unprofessional slant, and a lot of work optimizing scenes through Unity.


    Consider this option, there is a cloud compute offering available today that gives access to a remote PC that is outfitted with a GTX 1080. In theory, similar steps as outlined above can work with this cloud PC as well, and the service to access the cloud PC is $12-$15 per month, with new higher-spec offerings coming soon. Enscape supporting multi-user collaboration is now the only hurdle in achieving what is desired if you have the capability to do the above steps as we would be able to provide a client a login for the cloud PC to view the VR from their home/office utilizing only an Oculus Quest and a good internet connection.


    This wireless VR setup today is just a stepping stone to get to the ultimate goal. We have overcome some of the "wait your turn" issue by mirroring the VR participant's view to a large screen or projector in the same environment. It is not ideal, but it is what we have today, and our clients are finding it useful in sparking discussions that would otherwise not occur. The pandemic is another factor making it impossible to continue using Enscape to collaborate in that sort of environment, but we have the scenes set up for Enscape already so we have been rendering to 360 and the clients are using these during zoom meetings effectively.

  • An app for the Oculus store from Enscape would go a long way towards a great setup and user experience. You could each fire up a Quest and experience the environment at the same time. This is the way Prospect Pro works, and we've been using it quite a bit as of late - connecting several people at once who are all in their homes. The issue here is that the Enscape scene may have to be substantially reduced in quality for stand-alone mode.

    However, I've been pushing to simply get away from a VR experience whenever possible. For large groups, it's never going to be that effective. There's simply no substitute for broadcasting your scene on a huge monitor and taking folks around the space. Or...in keeping with the latest 'at home' virtual meetings, firing up Microsoft Teams and doing a walk thru screen share. Teams has an incredibly great compression algo that keeps frame rates very high indeed.